Everything Early Modern Women

All things to do with the study of early modern women.

Early Modern Women and Transnationalism: | Society for the Study of Early Modern Women

Post by Anne R. Larsen for SSEMW: Early Modern Women and Transnationalism: | Society for the Study of Early Modern Women

‘My love is as a fever . . .’: Love Treatises in the Renaissance | UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

CMRS Ahmanson Conference Treatises discussing the origin, nature, and effects of love are prevalent throughout the European Renaissance. The Neo-Platonic tradition of love treatises has been studied for its philosophical and literary implications and for its influence on sixteenth-century culture; these studies have illuminated how the “ladder of love” model permeates poetry, prose narratives, and […]

Source: ‘My love is as a fever . . .’: Love Treatises in the Renaissance | UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Announcing a New Folger Fellowship in Honor of Margaret Hannay

From  The Collation

“We’re proud to announce the creation of a new fellowship at the Folger Shakespeare Library. In partnership with the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women, the Folger Institute will offer a fellowship to scholars working on studies of women, genders, and/or sexualities in the early modern world, who can demonstrate a clear need to utilize the Folger’s collections. This $2500 award will allow a scholar to spend one month in residence at the Folger.

The Society for the Study of Early Modern Women (SSEMW) is a network of scholars who meet annually, sponsor sessions at national and international conferences across a spectrum of disciplines, and support one another’s work in the field. SSEMW maintains a listserv and website, sponsors a blog series on topics relating to early modern women, gives awards for outstanding scholarship, and fosters intellectual exchange and collaboration. SSEMW welcomes scholars and teachers from any discipline who study women and their contributions to the cultural, political, economic, or social spheres of the early modern period and whose interest in it includes attention to gender, sexuality, and representations of women.”

For more, http://collation.folger.edu/2017/01/announcing-new-folger-fellowship-honor-margaret-hannay/

CFP: Writing Women’s Friendship in Early Modern England (1/12/17; 5/27-29/17)

Seeking a third paper to complete a panel on writing women’s friendships in the early modern period to be presented at the annual meeting of the Canadian Society for Renaissance Studies at Congress 2017, to be held at Ryerson University in Toronto, Ontario, May 27-29, 2017.

This panel will consider how women’s friendships inspired them to write in the early modern period. How did women describe their friendships in writing? How are women’s friendships written about in the early modern period? How can we identify and document women’s friendships? Papers might consider:

  • Women writing about friendship or its absence
  • Descriptions of women’s friendships in poetry or drama
  • Historical friendships between women
  • Women’s networks of letters
  • New methods for tracing women’s friendships
  • Impact of women’s friendships on their social networks

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent to Jantina Ellens at ellensjc@mcmaster.ca by January 12, 2017.

For the general call for papers for this conference, see the link to the Toronto 2017 Congress at this website:  http://www.csrs-scer.ca/congress.htm

Upcoming conference: ‘My love is as a fever . . .’: Love Treatises in the Renaissance | UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies | January 20-21, 2017

Please consider coming to UCLA for this CMRS Ahmanson Conference

I will be presenting some of my work in progress on medical representations of women’s love ailments. The draft program promises a wide variety of excellent speakers from across art history, history, and literature.

Their description: “Treatises discussing the origin, nature, and effects of love are prevalent throughout the European Renaissance. The Neo-Platonic tradition of love treatises has been studied for its philosophical and literary implications and for its influence on sixteenth-century culture; these studies have illuminated how the “ladder of love” model permeates poetry, prose narratives, and religious and moral treatises. Less attention has been paid to medical treatises dealing with the somatogenesis of love and its effects, or chapters in books of natural philosophy discussing the workings of erotic passion. While Neo-Platonic treatises focus on how one should love and the moral and spiritual value of love, medical treatises offer insight into the early modern conception of what love is and how the body reacts to it. A coherent discussion of love in the Renaissance must concern itself with both types of treatise because the phenomenon as a whole can only be understood if both aspects are studied together. How was the experience of love conceived of as a bodily phenomenon? How does that inflect our understanding of love as a moral value, a religious experience, or an object of aesthetic representation? In addition to exploring how love was valued in Renaissance culture, this conference also examines how love was constructed and conceived of in physical, medical terms, approaching the two types of love treatises as creating one complex, coherent genre.”

Source: ‘My love is as a fever . . .’: Love Treatises in the Renaissance | UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

“Women’s Work in Rural England, 1500-1700”

For your Tuesday reading pleasure:

“Welcome to the website for the project ‘Women’s Work in Rural England, 1500-1700: A New Methodological Approach’. Funded by the Leverhulme Trust and based at the University of Exeter, the project started in January 2015 and will run until the summer of 2018.”

Source: Home

Early Modern Nasty Women: Shrews, Scolds, and Whores

Members of the National Women’s Studies Association Early Modern Women Interest Group seek paper proposals for a panel on “Early Modern Nasty Women: Shrews, Scolds, and Whores” for the NWSA annual conference in Baltimore, Maryland, Nov 16-19 2017.

The Early Modern Women Interest group aims to propose a sponsored panel under the conference subtheme of “engaging, questioning, and transcending the state.”

We seek papers that address:

  • Canonical early modern women writers’ support of state power
  • Early modern representations of disruptive, unruly, or innovative women
  • How early modern women’s negotiations of power prefigure contemporary politics
  • Early modern women and race vis-a-vis the proto-capitalist state

Please send abstracts of 250 words and a list of major primary and secondary sources to jessica.c.murphy@gmail.com by January 10, 2017.

The NWSA annual conference regularly draws more than 1,700 attendees and is the only annual meeting exclusively dedicated to showcasing the latest feminist scholarship. The 2017 conference theme is “40 Years After Combahee: Feminist Scholars and Activists Engage the Movement for Black Lives.” For more information about the National Women’s Studies Association visit www.nwsa.org.

Women Writers in Review

Women Writers in Review is a collection of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century reviews, publication notices, literary histories, and other texts responding to works by early women writers. Women Writers in Review is published by the Women Writers Project at Northeastern University and was created as part of the Cultures of Reception initiative, which fosters research into the transatlantic reception and circulation of early women’s texts.

Source: Women Writers in Review

Women and Gender in the Early Modern World book series

Book series of interest: https://unpblog.com/2016/06/16/new-series-women-and-gender-in-the-early-modern-world/

wgmw-7

Announcing… Our 2nd Annual Transcribathon! | emroc

Calling all transcribers! Last October, we hosted our first ever transcribathon. It was so much fun and such a success that we’ve decided to do it all again. We’d like to invite you to join us. Date? 9 November 2016 … Continue reading →

Source: Announcing… Our 2nd Annual Transcribathon! | emroc