Meanings of Green: The Varied Perceptions of Nature, Vol. 1 No. 2, Winter 2009 | cfp.english.upenn.edu

by Jessica C. Murphy

Presently receiving & reviewing submissions for the Winter 2009 issueAuthors are asked to critically discuss meanings of ‘nature’ or ‘environment’ that clash or harmonize with discourses and/or conservation practices across cultures and time.Possible Topics to be Explored in no way exhaustiveCompeting Views of Naturea. Creation stories – nature as a gifte.g.: Genesis, Shinto, Buddhist, animist, pantheist, secularist, etc.b. Instrumental – nature as object for human use; humans possess inherent subject status that affords them the self-proclaimed right to exploite.g.: Drilling for oil, gas, coal. Diverting rivers, damming rivers, etc.c. Warehouse – storing genetic materials for present and future human use; rainforest and other eco-systems as repositories of presently and conceivable value for future human neede.g.: drugs, medications, new strains of plant life for human consumptiond. Cathedral-Holy place – nature as a source of inspiration and worshipe.g.: Nature parks, national parks; also literary productions extolling oneness with other forms, etc.e. Holistic – nature as a value in itself, independent of human need or desire

e.g.: Every life form has its own reason for being, independent of human use or intent. Every life form – at least sentient life – has an interest in living, etc. All submissions will be evaluated using a double-blind at least three reviewers peer review process.

Details regarding the submission process appear at http://www.synaesthesiajournal.com/

If you wish to be added to or removed from the mailing list, please respond to editors@synaesthesiajournal.com

via Meanings of Green: The Varied Perceptions of Nature, Vol. 1 No. 2, Winter 2009 | cfp.english.upenn.edu.

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