Everything Early Modern Women

All things to do with the study of early modern women.

CFP: Books and Bodies in Early Modern England (7/15/18; RSA 2019)

via http://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/cfp/2018/06/05/books-and-bodies-in-early-modern-england-rsa-2019

Organizers: Jillian Linster (University of South Dakota) and Harry Newman (Royal Holloway, University of London)

For a proposed panel at RSA 2019 (Toronto, March 17-19)

This panel investigates links between literary and medical culture in early modern England (c. 1500-1700), focusing on the intersections of book history and medical humanities. Scholarship has started to address the physiology of reading, the role of the book trade in disseminating and shaping medical knowledge, and the mutually influential relationship between literary and medical texts. Building on this work, we seek papers focused on the physical and conceptual relationships between books and bodies in early modernity. Papers might consider the following:

  • How did changing technologies, laws, reading habits, and/or the rise of print culture affect the interaction of bodies and books in this period?
  • How did specific books come to represent individual people, and vice versa?
  • How were the bodies of books shaped and reshaped by physical encounters with human bodies (e.g. printers, book binders, readers)?
  • Does the relationship between books and bodies help us to understand power and agency in early modernity?
  • Why is it important to investigate the material lives and textual histories of medical books (anatomical works, midwifery manuals, dietaries, casebooks, herbals, medical receipt books, etc.)?
  • How is the relationship between books and bodies depicted in literary works, artistic renderings, and historical documents from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries?
  • How useful are distinctions between ‘literary’ and ‘medical’ texts when considering the book-body relationship?
  • What was the influence of other cultures (European or non-Western) on English perceptions of books and bodies?

Approaches might include or combine book history, medical humanities, ecocriticism, new materialism, sociological or anthropological theory, social and cultural history, and biblical studies. Non-traditional or experimental lines of inquiry are encouraged. Proposals are welcome from scholars working in any discipline.

Please submit your paper proposal by 15th July 2018, to Jillian Linster and Harry Newman at booksandbodies.panel@gmail.com. The proposal should include the following information in a single document:

  • Name, affiliation and email address
  • Paper title (15 words max)
  • Abstract (150 words max)
  • Keywords
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CFP: The Female Body as Text in Renaissance Literature (7/13/18; RSA 2019)

via http://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/cfp/2018/06/14/rsa-panel-the-female-body-as-text-in-renaissance-literature

As the Renaissance saw a rise in female literacy and texts addressed to women readers, the relationship between gender and genre was foregrounded in debates about the appropriate texts for women to read – or if it was appropriate for women to read at all.  These conversations particularly centered on the genre of romance, simultaneously a genre classed as feminine and a genre deemed morally inappropriate for women to read. While these debates raged outside literary texts, within the texts themselves, we see women reading and women as objects to be read – both by the reader of the text and by other characters within the text. How does the female body serve as a text within a text? What unique possibilities does the female body offer for allegory, for interpretation, or for generic symbolism? How is the female body productively linked to literary meaning in the Renaissance? This session, sponsored by UCLA’s CMRS, proposes to explore these issues through interdisciplinary papers and discussion.

If interested in submitting a proposal for this panel, please send a paper title, a 150 word abstract, and a CV to Allison Collins (abcollins@ucla.edu) by 13 July 2018.

CFP: Transforming Bodies in Early Modern Drama (7/16/18; RSA 2019)

via http://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/cfp/2018/06/17/rsa-2019-transforming-bodies-in-early-modern-drama-july-16th-2018

Transforming Bodies in Early Modern Drama

How are bodies–of people, plants, or animals–transformed on the early modern stage? What are the agents of transformation, and is there something about drama in particular that allows for bodily transformation? How is transformation represented (or not represented) dramatically? What constitutes a “body” on stage, and is a body still the same if parts of it transform? What does the transformation of the body tell us about corporeal unity, identity, transformation, or the instability of the body or identity? How can bodily transformation intersect with theoretic frameworks such as materialism, historicism, ecocriticism, animal studies, or the post-human? Topics may include (but are not limited to) the way violence (physical, sexual, verbal), ritual, disguise, death, love, the natural world, disease, wounds, language, power, fear, etc have a transforming effect on the early modern human and non-human bodies that populate early modern drama, through any theoretical lens. Please send 150-word abstracts and brief CV to Christina M. Squitieri (cms531@nyu.edu) and Penelope Meyers Usher (pfm250@nyu.edu) by Monday, July 16th, 2018. This panel will be sponsored by the Early Modern and Renaissance Society at New York University.