Everything Early Modern Women

All things to do with the study of early modern women.

CFP: Women and Translation in the Renaissance (5/22/17; RSA 2018)


This panel intends to explore the part played by women within the multilingual and multicultural contexts of Renaissance Europe by means of translation. In the last few decades an expanding corpus of scholarly works on women’s role in the history and cultures of translation has greatly contributed to expand our knowledge in the field, especially with reference to Early Modern England and, partly, France. Aiming to further extend our understanding of the cultural history of translation during the Renaissance, this panel welcomes papers that focus on women’s contribution, as agents of all kinds (e.g. translations for and by women, translations of women’s writings), to the production and circulation of translations. We particularly encourage proposals that examine linguistic and cultural traditions (e.g. Italian, German, Portuguese, Spanish, Polish), or specific aspects and issues that have so far received less attention.

Questions to be considered when submitting proposals include, but are not limited to: the multilingual and multicultural contexts in which translations took place and were received; linguistic tools and practices of language learning; the role of translation in women’s education and as means of learning a language to improve one’s cultural literacy; the role of different agents, not only translators, but also patrons, printers, and readers, in the circulation of translations; individual/collaborative translations; translations by means of other languages; translations from (or into) classical languages/from vernacular to vernacular; translation practices and attitudes; modes of production, distribution and reception of translations; ownership and material aspects of translated works; manuscript and print translations; the influence and uses of translations; translations of women’s writings.

Proposals with an interdisciplinary and transnational approach to the topic are particularly welcome. Given the cross-cultural nature of the panel, presentations in English are strongly encouraged. Please send a 150-word abstract, with a title and a list of key words, and a short CV (300-word maximum) in a single Word document to Dr Helena Sanson (hls37@cam.ac.uk), by Monday 22 May 2017. Please see the guidelines for abstracts and CVs on the RSA’s annual meeting page.


UPDATE: SCMLA Renaissance Literature excluding Drama (4/10/17; 10/5-8/17)

Did you miss the deadline for submissions? We are working on rounding out a second panel for this regular session; please send your abstract.

We are currently accepting submissions for the Renaissance Literature excluding Drama panel of the South Central Modern Language Association conference, October 5-8, 2017, in Tulsa, OK.
The topic is open, but we encourage paper proposals to engage meaningfully with some aspect of the conference theme, ““Moving Words: Migrations, Translations, and Transformations” Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words to Jessica C. Murphy & Rebecca Sader (jessica.c.murphy@gmail.com) by April 10, 2017.
For more information on the SCMLA and the conference location, visithttp://www.southcentralmla.org/


Attending to Early Modern Women: Action and Agency, Preliminary CFP

From Merry E Wiesner-Hanks:

Attending to Early Modern Women: Action and Agency

Preliminary Call for Proposals

 June 14-17, 2018     Milwaukee, WI

Over its time in Milwaukee, Attending to Early Modern Women first asked “where?” (Remapping Routes and Spaces, 2012). Then we asked “when?” (It’s About Time, 2015). Now we ask “how?” For both our subjects and ourselves, the answer is the same: action and agency. The conference will address these themes, posing such questions as: How do we understand the sites and modes of gendered confrontations in the early modern period? What collectivities were possible, then and now, and how and why do they form and fade? How do women imagine choice, and what role does choice or the illusion of choice play in their lives? How can our work as scholars and teachers of a distant period become action?

The conference will retain its innovative format, using a workshop model for most of its sessions to promote dialogue, augmented by a keynote lecture, and a plenary panel on each of the four conference topics: confrontation, collectivity, choice, and pedagogy. It will be held at the UW-Milwaukee School of Continuing Education in the heart of downtown Milwaukee, and conference attendees will stay in the near-by Doubletree Hotel. Attendees will also have the opportunity to participate in a pre-conference workshop at the Newberry Library in Chicago.

Start thinking now about organizing workshop sessions. These are 90-minute sessions organized by a group of two to four leaders who circulate readings, questions, and other materials in advance through the conference website. Leaders spend no more than twenty minutes framing the issues and opening up the conversation, then facilitate active participation and focused discussion. The best workshops are often comparative and interdisciplinary, and all allow participants to share information and ignorance, pass on knowledge, ask advice, and learn something new. All workshop organizers are expected to register for, attend, and participate in the entire conference, not just their workshop.

Workshops that consider action and agency in relationship to the following topics are welcome:


Resistance and revolt; conflict within and across communities and cultures; contesting categorization; opposing authority; clashes within and across disciplines; crises and resolutions


Cultural, intellectual, and religious spaces; familial and economic networks; labor organization; building consensus; objects in circulation; collaboration and alliances; expressing identities; border-crossing


Creativity and imagination; constraint; autonomy and agency beyond the human realm; articulating sexuality; consumer practices and material culture


Engaged scholarship in public spaces and the classroom; defending the premodern and the humanities; choosing technologies; learners as agents

The formal call for proposals will be out this summer, and the due date for proposals will be November 15.

In the meantime, if you have an idea for a workshop session or questions about the conference, please contact Merry Wiesner-Hanks, ATW-2018 Organizing Committee Chair, at atw-2018@uwm.edu.

CFP: Early Modern Women, Religion, Theology, and Spirituality (4/3/17; 10/26-29/17)

Organizers: Anne Larsen, Julie Campbell, and Diana Robin

We would like to propose panels on women’s participation in the areas of religion, theology, spirituality, and roles of women in the church on the Continent and in England in the early modern period. As more information comes to light about women’s participation in activities involving preaching, prophesying, experimental spirituality, and religious controversies during the early modern era, it is clear that we have much to learn about the women who incorporated such activities into their lives and, in some cases, dedicated their lives to such pursuits.

The questions we would like to ask are: How did these women pursue these activities? Who were their sponsors, mentors, collaborators, and spiritual companions? How were they accepted or rejected in the contexts of their activities? What means of participation did they use—writing, oratory, conversation, or experimentation? What sorts of educations enabled these women to participate in these areas?

Please send abstracts of no more than 150 words and a one-page C.V. by Monday 3 April, by email attachment, to each of the following:

Anne Larsen, French, Hope College alarsen@hope.edu

Julie Campbell, English, Eastern Illinois University jdcampbell@eiu.edu

Diana Robin, Classics and Italian, Newberry Library, Diana.robin@rcn.com

CFP: English Renaissance Literature excluding Drama (SCMLA 3/31/17; 10/5-8/17)

We are currently accepting submissions for the Renaissance Literature excluding Drama panel of the South Central Modern Language Association conference, October 5-8, 2017, in Tulsa, OK.
The topic is open, but we encourage paper proposals to engage meaningfully with some aspect of the conference theme, “Moving Words: Migrations, Translations, and Transformations” Please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words to Jessica C. Murphy & Rebecca Sader (jessica.c.murphy@gmail.com) by March 31, 2017.
For more information on the SCMLA and the conference location, visit http://www.southcentralmla.org/

CFP: Renaissance Drama (SCMLA 3/31/17; 10/5-8/17)

The conference theme is “Moving Words: Migrations, Translations, and Transformations,” but papers are welcome on any topic pertaining to Renaissance Drama. Send abstracts of 250 words to Rochelle Bradley (rochelle.bradley@blinn.edu).

Source: cfp | call for papers

Women Writers Online free in March

From Julia Flanders:
We are delighted to announce that Women Writers Online (http://wwp.northeastern.edu/wwo/) will once again be free during March, in celebration of Women’s History Month. This collection includes almost 400 texts written and translated by women, first published between 1526 and 1850. For more information on getting started with WWO, please see this post (http://wwp.northeastern.edu/blog/free-march/) on our blog.

In addition to WWO, we also have several publications that are always open-access, including:
• Women Writers in Review: a collection of almost 700 reviews of and responses to works by the authors in WWO. WWiR is open access and linked with WWO, so that readers can easily navigate between both collections. http://wwp.northeastern.edu/review/
• Women Writers in Context: a collection of essays exploring topics related to early women’s writing. WWiC provides core background information for the texts in WWO and WWiR, while highlighting shared themes and historical interconnections and helping readers to discover new works by women writers. http://wwp.northeastern.edu/context/
• Teaching materials: We have recently begun an initiative to partner with faculty on developing assignments and activities using WWO and WWiR. You’ll find more information on our teaching partner program, along with an initial set of assignments here: http://wwp.northeastern.edu/wwo/teaching/pedagogical-dev.html
Please feel free to contact us (WWP@northeastern.edu) if you would like more information about WWO or any of the Women Writers Project’s publications.

We hope that you enjoy these collections!

Best wishes, Julia

Julia Flanders
Director, Women Writers Project
Northeastern University

CFP: “Show thy queere substance”: The Queer, the Early Modern and the Now (3/3/2017; 7/7-8/2017)

“Show thy queere substance”: The Queer, the Early Modern and the Now

Friday 7th July (evening) and Saturday 8th July 2017

Department of English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies, University of Westminster



A 2015 episode of RuPaul’s Drag Race saw the work of Shakespeare make a perhaps rather surprising appearance on the show. In the episode, titled ‘Shakesqueer’, the season eight queens performed in rewritten Shakespeare plays – Romeo and Juliet became ‘Romy and Juliet’ and Macbeth became ‘Macbitch’. In 2016, the Globe gave us a production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream with Helenus (played by male actor Ankur Bahl) rather than Helena, transforming the relationship with Demetrius (and indeed Lysander) into an overtly queer one. At exactly the same moment, Russell T. Davies inserted a lesbian kiss into his BBC adaptation of the same play – a kiss which prompted Katie Hopkins to declare “I don’t want Shakespeare queered-up so you feel more at home”.


This queer cultural exploration of the Early Modern is happening at the same time that academic scholarship continues to use queer theoretical frames as a way of illuminating and interrogating Early Modern texts and contexts. Notably, this can be seen in John S. Garrison’s Friendship and Queer Theory in the Renaissance: Gender and Sexuality in Early Modern England (2013); Simone Chess’ Male-to-Female Crossdressing in Early Modern English Literature: Gender, Performance, and Queer Relations (2016); and Will Stockton’s forthcoming Members of His Body (2017), amongst many, many others.


This one-day symposium seeks to ask two questions: firstly, what can queer frames tell us about Early Modern texts and contexts? Secondly, in what ways can the Early Modern (be it literature, culture or politics) speak to queer cultures in the present? To put it another way?, what do queer reiterations of Early Modern texts and contexts achieve in the present?


Topics may include but not be limited to:

  • the intersections between queerness and race in both Early Modern; texts/contexts and contemporary reiterations of Early Modern cultural artefacts;
  • queer uses of Early Modern texts in the contemporary;
  • queer readings of Early Modern texts or contexts;
  • what it means to suggest that a “queered-up” Shakespeare (for example) might make one feel “more at home”;
  • consideration of contemporary productions of Early Modern plays which draw out queerness or which introduce queerness;
  • queer history/histories.


Abstract of 250 words, accompanied by a short bio, should be submitted to Kate Graham at k.graham1@westminster.ac.uk by March 3rd 2017.


The symposium is supported by the Queer London Research Forum and the Department of English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies at the University of Westminster.

Source: cfp | call for papers

Annual workshop – Women’s Studies Group 1558 – 1837: The fruitful body: gender and image

Early modern painted portraits are constructs. They result from a series of choices – what to include, what to exclude – made to suit specific contexts and purposes. Karen’s paper will consider 16th and early 17thC British portraits of women, addressing the types of information they offer to present-day users/viewers.

Source: Annual workshop – Women’s Studies Group 1558 – 1837


This series presents studies of early modern contacts and exchanges among the states, polities, cultures, religions, and entrepreneurial organizations of Europe; Asia, including the Levant and East India/Indies; Africa; and the Americas. Books investigate diverse figures, such as travelers, merchants, mariners, cultural inventors — explorers, mapmakers, artists, craftsmen and writers — as they operated in political, mercantile, sexual, affective, and linguistic economies. We encourage authors to reflect on their own methodologies in relation to issues and theories relevant to the study of transculturalism, translation, and transnationalism. We are particularly interested in work on and from the perspective of the Asians, Africans, and Americans involved in these interactions, and on such topics as:

  •  Material exchanges: including textiles, paper and printing, and technologies of knowledge
  •  Movements and exchanges of bodies: embassies, voyagers, piracy, enslavement
  •  Forms of transnational violence and its representations
  •  Travel writing: its purposes, practices, forms, and effects on writing in other genres
  •  Belief systems: religions, philosophies, sciences
  •  Translations: verbal, artistic, philosophical
  • Aesthetic practices and systems of representation

Visit Source for Info: NEW TRANSCULTURALISMS – 1400-1800 – JYOTSNA G. SINGH