Everything Early Modern Women

All things to do with the study of early modern women.

CFP: Early Modern Satire: Themes, Re-Evaluations and Practices (2/15/17; 11/2 – 4/17)

Early modern satire – broadly, from c. 1500 to c. 1800 – is a vast but still underexamined field of representation. Although flourishing in certain periods and certain places, satire can be said to be integral to the European project, often challenging the limits of tolerance and evoking hostility but also associated, increasingly in this period, with notions of freedom and enlightenment. This conference, hosted by University of Gothenburg, seeks to position satire as a mode of representation throughout early modern Europe and clarify its role in politics, culture and religion. We seek proposals from scholars in all fields who work on aspects of satire in the period. Especially welcome are contributions that explore satire as a form of representation existing across boundaries – of territories, of genres and/or periods. We also welcome proposals that situate satire in a wider aesthetic context, including cross-disciplinary work that seeks to address satire as a mode of for example visual representation.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • The mediation of satire. Described variously as a ‘genre’ and a ‘mode’, satire often transgresses medial and generic boundaries during the early modern period. Is satire more of an ‘intermedial’ phenomenon in certain periods and places?
  • The gendering of satire. Early modern satire in has been characterized as very much a male enterprise. Are there variations over time and between places, as regards for example female authorship, and in terms of form and theme, how does satire depict aspects of femininity and masculinity?
  • Satire and censorship. Always having had a complex relationship with authority, satire in the early modern period also saw the rise of the print medium and various attempts at regulating published output. How do censorship and other forms of regulative interventions shape satirical texts (in a wide sense)?
  • Perspectives on the classical heritage. Although a thoroughly investigated field, the relationship between early modern satire and its classical predecessors is still relevant as a field of inquiry. Just how dependent was early modern satire on its Horatian, Juvenalian and other role models?
  • Satire and religion. While relating to classical forms and themes, satire also has a complex relation to Christian religion as both a target and a formative system of belief. In what ways do changes in religious institutions and norms affect the production of early modern satire?
  • Satire and medical discourse. The frequent description of satire as ‘melancholy’, for example, suggests links to humoral theory and other aspects of physiology. To what extent can satire be understood in such terms?
  • Satire and the canon. While for example literary history has ascribed a central role to satire in the 18th century, scholarly discussion is often based on select examples and relegate others to the margin. What are the social and historical determinants of the ‘lasting appeal’ of certain satirical texts?

Confirmed keynote speakers include Francesca Alberti (University of Tours), Victoria Moul (King’s College London), Ola Sigurdson (University of Gothenburg) and Howard Weinbrot (University of Wisconsin-Madison).

Presentations are strictly limited to 20 minutes in length. A 250-word abstract, a title, and a 50-word biographical statement should be submitted to earlymodernsatire@lir.gu.se by 15 February, 2017. Enquiries may be directed to this address, to Dr. Per Sivefors at per.sivefors@lnu.se or Dr. Rikard Wingård at rikard.wingard@lir.gu.se.

Web: http://lir.gu.se/forskning/forskningssamverkan/tidigmoderna-seminariet/e…

Source: cfp | call for papers

CFP: “Early Modern Women and the Environment” (4/1/17; MLA 2018)

The Society for the Study of Early Modern Women (ssemw.org) invites proposals for a sponsored roundtable at the Modern Language Association in New York, January 4-7, 2018. The session approved by SSEMW (as an Affiliated Organization) is automatically accepted for the MLA convention. All participants must be members of both MLA and SSEMW by April 1, 2017.

 

We invite proposals on the topic of early modern women and the environment. Topics might include women’s management of natural or built environments; theoretical approaches (new materialist, ecofeminist, and others) to gender and place; or evidence of creative ‘authorship’ in women’s environments. Contributions from a variety of disciplines and national literatures are encouraged.

 

The roundtable will consist of brief (10-minute) opening comments by five speakers followed by general discussion. Although initial comments may be presented formally or informally, each participant should provide an abstract describing his/her contribution.

 

Proposals for full roundtables must include:

–              names of speakers; institutional affiliations; and email addresses

–              brief biographies for speakers (150 words each)

–              presentation abstracts (10 minutes each) (150 words each)

–              specification of audio/visual needs

 

Proposals for individual papers, consisting of a 150-word presentation abstract and a brief biography (150 words) are also welcome.

 

Please send proposals by Wednesday, March 15, 2017, to Patricia Phillippy, SSEMW liaison with the Modern Language Association, atp.phillippy@kingston.ac.uk.

NEH-Funded KairosCamp Institutes–EMOB

EMOB Members who also receive ASECS emails have no doubt already seen this announcement for a new institute series at West Virginia University aimed at providing both authors and editors with the training that will enable them to produce a variety of digital forms of scholarships. That the project is a joint effort of the […]

via NEH-Funded KairosCamp Institutes — Early Modern Online Bibliography

Early Modern Women and Transnationalism: | Society for the Study of Early Modern Women

Post by Anne R. Larsen for SSEMW: Early Modern Women and Transnationalism: | Society for the Study of Early Modern Women

‘My love is as a fever . . .’: Love Treatises in the Renaissance | UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

CMRS Ahmanson Conference Treatises discussing the origin, nature, and effects of love are prevalent throughout the European Renaissance. The Neo-Platonic tradition of love treatises has been studied for its philosophical and literary implications and for its influence on sixteenth-century culture; these studies have illuminated how the “ladder of love” model permeates poetry, prose narratives, and […]

Source: ‘My love is as a fever . . .’: Love Treatises in the Renaissance | UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Announcing a New Folger Fellowship in Honor of Margaret Hannay

From  The Collation

“We’re proud to announce the creation of a new fellowship at the Folger Shakespeare Library. In partnership with the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women, the Folger Institute will offer a fellowship to scholars working on studies of women, genders, and/or sexualities in the early modern world, who can demonstrate a clear need to utilize the Folger’s collections. This $2500 award will allow a scholar to spend one month in residence at the Folger.

The Society for the Study of Early Modern Women (SSEMW) is a network of scholars who meet annually, sponsor sessions at national and international conferences across a spectrum of disciplines, and support one another’s work in the field. SSEMW maintains a listserv and website, sponsors a blog series on topics relating to early modern women, gives awards for outstanding scholarship, and fosters intellectual exchange and collaboration. SSEMW welcomes scholars and teachers from any discipline who study women and their contributions to the cultural, political, economic, or social spheres of the early modern period and whose interest in it includes attention to gender, sexuality, and representations of women.”

For more, http://collation.folger.edu/2017/01/announcing-new-folger-fellowship-honor-margaret-hannay/

CFP: Writing Women’s Friendship in Early Modern England (1/12/17; 5/27-29/17)

Seeking a third paper to complete a panel on writing women’s friendships in the early modern period to be presented at the annual meeting of the Canadian Society for Renaissance Studies at Congress 2017, to be held at Ryerson University in Toronto, Ontario, May 27-29, 2017.

This panel will consider how women’s friendships inspired them to write in the early modern period. How did women describe their friendships in writing? How are women’s friendships written about in the early modern period? How can we identify and document women’s friendships? Papers might consider:

  • Women writing about friendship or its absence
  • Descriptions of women’s friendships in poetry or drama
  • Historical friendships between women
  • Women’s networks of letters
  • New methods for tracing women’s friendships
  • Impact of women’s friendships on their social networks

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent to Jantina Ellens at ellensjc@mcmaster.ca by January 12, 2017.

For the general call for papers for this conference, see the link to the Toronto 2017 Congress at this website:  http://www.csrs-scer.ca/congress.htm

Upcoming conference: ‘My love is as a fever . . .’: Love Treatises in the Renaissance | UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies | January 20-21, 2017

Please consider coming to UCLA for this CMRS Ahmanson Conference

I will be presenting some of my work in progress on medical representations of women’s love ailments. The draft program promises a wide variety of excellent speakers from across art history, history, and literature.

Their description: “Treatises discussing the origin, nature, and effects of love are prevalent throughout the European Renaissance. The Neo-Platonic tradition of love treatises has been studied for its philosophical and literary implications and for its influence on sixteenth-century culture; these studies have illuminated how the “ladder of love” model permeates poetry, prose narratives, and religious and moral treatises. Less attention has been paid to medical treatises dealing with the somatogenesis of love and its effects, or chapters in books of natural philosophy discussing the workings of erotic passion. While Neo-Platonic treatises focus on how one should love and the moral and spiritual value of love, medical treatises offer insight into the early modern conception of what love is and how the body reacts to it. A coherent discussion of love in the Renaissance must concern itself with both types of treatise because the phenomenon as a whole can only be understood if both aspects are studied together. How was the experience of love conceived of as a bodily phenomenon? How does that inflect our understanding of love as a moral value, a religious experience, or an object of aesthetic representation? In addition to exploring how love was valued in Renaissance culture, this conference also examines how love was constructed and conceived of in physical, medical terms, approaching the two types of love treatises as creating one complex, coherent genre.”

Source: ‘My love is as a fever . . .’: Love Treatises in the Renaissance | UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

“Women’s Work in Rural England, 1500-1700”

For your Tuesday reading pleasure:

“Welcome to the website for the project ‘Women’s Work in Rural England, 1500-1700: A New Methodological Approach’. Funded by the Leverhulme Trust and based at the University of Exeter, the project started in January 2015 and will run until the summer of 2018.”

Source: Home

Early Modern Nasty Women: Shrews, Scolds, and Whores

Members of the National Women’s Studies Association Early Modern Women Interest Group seek paper proposals for a panel on “Early Modern Nasty Women: Shrews, Scolds, and Whores” for the NWSA annual conference in Baltimore, Maryland, Nov 16-19 2017.

The Early Modern Women Interest group aims to propose a sponsored panel under the conference subtheme of “engaging, questioning, and transcending the state.”

We seek papers that address:

  • Canonical early modern women writers’ support of state power
  • Early modern representations of disruptive, unruly, or innovative women
  • How early modern women’s negotiations of power prefigure contemporary politics
  • Early modern women and race vis-a-vis the proto-capitalist state

Please send abstracts of 250 words and a list of major primary and secondary sources to jessica.c.murphy@gmail.com by January 10, 2017.

The NWSA annual conference regularly draws more than 1,700 attendees and is the only annual meeting exclusively dedicated to showcasing the latest feminist scholarship. The 2017 conference theme is “40 Years After Combahee: Feminist Scholars and Activists Engage the Movement for Black Lives.” For more information about the National Women’s Studies Association visit www.nwsa.org.